Workers who have shared their careers between the United States and a foreign country may not be entitled to pensions, survivor benefits or disability insurance (pensions) from one or both countries because they have not worked long or recently enough to meet minimum conditions. Under an agreement, these workers may benefit from partially U.S. or foreign benefits on the basis of combined or “totalized” coverage credits from both countries. Thank you for all your wisdom on this very important subject. I wonder about the Agreement between Canada and the United Kingdom on Social Security. I am 41 years old and for most of my professional life (since 2001) I live and work in Canada. The competent authority of the People`s Republic of China and a province of Canada may enter into agreements on all social security issues within the provincial jurisdiction in Canada if these agreements are not inconsistent with this agreement. Doug. I was born in Canada, moved to Europe at a young age and had my first professional experience in Italy from 1981 to 1984, 3 and a half years. Then he returned to Canada and has been working here ever since. Can I transfer the years of work to Italy to Canada to be part of my QPP (i.e. Quebec)? If not, do I have other options? Relationships between this agreement and other international agreements Here is an off-wall question for you…

I worked 28 quarters in the U.S. – the balance of my working life was in Canada (I`m 74 years old). I collect OAS/CPP…. The international agreements I recently signed have allowed me to obtain rights based on my work history. During my investigations, I could see that my contributions to US Soc Sec amounted to a total of $34,000.00 (USD), plus my employer made the same….. That was in 2009, when I came back to Canada. For almost 10 years, $68,000.00 has been sitting in the American SocSec pool…… I am grateful to have been qualified for the benefits of SocSec us, but the fact is that $68,000 – interest over 9 years was rightly mine – partial benefits for my working time in the United States. But my question is this: shouldn`t there be a contract or process that would allow me to recover the essential contributions I made to Medicare unemployment insurance, which I was not allowed to use as a NT worker? It just seems that these funds were once again part of the benefits package that me and my employer were… Are you aware of this situation? Any guide would be helpful. I want you to know that it was here through your site, and the various online chats that I even discovered the existence of these international treaties……

it took a year of treatment, but it finally paid off! They decided to make a deal for that, and hello Gordon – I`m not a social security expert in the U.S., but I think for some you`ll be entitled if you`ve contributed for at least 10 years. Under certain conditions, a worker may be exempt from coverage in a contracting country, even if he or she has not been transferred directly from the United States. For example, if a U.S. company sends an employee to its New York office to work for 4 years in its Hong Kong office, and then re-opens the employee for an additional 4 years in its London office, the employee may be a member of Social Security under the U.S.U.K. agreement. The detached labour rule applies in cases such as this, provided that the worker was originally sent from the United States and remained covered under the United States.